Excellent communication skills are essential for workplace success. If you’ve landed an interview, expect to be asked interview questions about how you communicate, and to have your ability to communicate in the workplace tested and evaluated. Regardless of the role, employers seek employees who can get along with others and who can communicate well both verbally and non-verbally.

When you interview for a job, the hiring manager will ask about communication skills, including how you address issues, how you handle challenging situations, what you expect as far as communication from management, and other questions related to your ability to communicate.

  1. HAVE YOU EVER HAD DIFFICULTY WORKING WITH A MANAGER?

Watch what you say and be careful answering questions about previous managers.

You don’t want to come across as difficult, and you want to cast any past experiences in the most positive light possible.

Even if your manager was awful, you don’t need to say so. You don’t know if perhaps your interviewer knows your former boss personally, and you also don’t know when your paths might cross again. It is always smart to be as considerate as possible when describing your relationship with a difficult manager. You gain nothing by coming across as bitter.

Discuss the strengths your past supervisors had and how they helped you succeed in your positions.

  1. WHAT ARE THE MOST DIFFICULT DECISIONS TO MAKE?

Decisions I have to make within a team are difficult, only because these decisions take more time and require deliberate communication between team members. For example, I was working on a team project, and my colleagues and I had to make a number of choices about how to use our limited budget. Because these decisions involved group conversations, our team learned how to communicate effectively with one another, and I believe we ultimately made the best decisions for the team.

  1. WHAT HAS BEEN THE GREATEST DISAPPOINTMENT IN YOUR LIFE?

You can respond directly to this type of question by mentioning a disappointment where you fell short of a very high expectation that you set for yourself. By doing so, you establish that you are a driven employee who strives for a high level of achievement.

For example, you might say: “My first year in sales I set a goal to be the leading salesperson in our office of nine salespeople. I was somewhat naive since most of the other staff were seasoned sellers with extensive product knowledge and well-developed relationships with clients. I was very disappointed when I ended up 4th in sales after my first year.